Tag Archives: teacher

End of 3rd Quarter

Hi everyone.

It’s the end of 3rd quarter, and we’ve got a grading day. Actually half-day. So I thought I should blog since I got the time! No kids! It’s some sort of miracle. I’m fortunate at my school to have a prep period and a department planning period… but during my prep, I can expect to supervise 8 to 10 up-to-no-good-but-so-lovable seniors. Up-to-no-good is definitely putting a positive spin on it. During my plan period, I can expect to supervise two or three accelerated freshmen for whom school comes easy and are mostly bored with it, and two or three sophomores who care, but need me to give them 1-1 tutoring in Geometry.

In short, having some time to myself in my classroom is some sort of miracle. It never happens. Now if only I had something interesting and substantial to blog about.

The kids are the best part of the job though. Forget grading, planning, and prepping. I do what I do because I believe in those little punks. They’re beautiful, lovely, funny, and smart. They deserve the best.

OK, here’s something worth blogging about. I just taught right triangle trigonometry to my Geometry kiddos. I love introducing trig. This year it conveniently followed a similarity unit, so I introduced it with a quick lab measuring sides of triangles and computing SOHCAHTOA ratios. Huh, weird, for any 30 degree angle in a right triangle, the ratio of the opposite side and the hypotenuse is the same. Huh, weird. (Similar triangles, anyone?)

Then we do some boring, but straightforward practice. Then the next class we go on a field trip. I love to advertise this next bit as a field trip, even though we only go down two floors to the Commons.

I start by having them estimate the height of the ceiling in the Commons (we regularly do Estimation180 in Geometry). Then I have them take out their telly-phones and download a free clinometer app. The only issue is the kids who say, “but I don’t have any room on my phone”. Maybe if you deleted some of those dang selfies, kid.

I crappily, but enthusiastically, model what they’re supposed to do. (My teaching career is a work in progress, OK? Year two is better than year one, at least.) I pass out the awesome, giant tape measures that the math department owns. We disperse down to the Commons. Chaos ensues, naturally, but we’re on a field trip in math class, so it’s a good thing. Tape measures are being stretched out, kids are pointing their phones at the ceiling, and most kids are sketching a triangle and writing down some sort of trigonometric equation. It’s my favorite day of the year.

Eventually we return to the classroom. My least-focused kid (one of those with an ADHD star next to his name in Infinite Campus) happily sits down and gets to work solving trig equations. How could he not? I just let him run around the Commons for 10 minutes.

They’re beautiful creatures, ya feel?

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8.4 trig lab

8.5 trig invest how high is ceiling (I think this was adapted from something from Tina Cardone @ drawingonmath ??? Not sure. But I definitely stand on the shoulders of giants. Thank you all.)

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Filed under fun, Geometry, grading, trig

Plans for the New Year

Happy new year! What a wonderful winter holiday this has been. I think I really lucked out as a first year teacher getting a two-week break from school this year. It was been a period of relaxation and rejuvenation, as well as a celebration of family, friends, and good times. And it’s not even over yet!

As a result, I’ve had plenty of time to reflect upon my teaching experience so far, and as a result, I’ve developed some ideas and plans for the new year and next semester’s classes. I still have two weeks left to wrap up before finals week, so while I may implement some fresh ideas now, I might not get around to all of them until the new semester starts.

Here are some thoughts I’ve had, in no particularly order.

1) Change up the seating arrangement. This one I’m going to save until second semester because I don’t want to throw off the kids right before finals week because I swear I’ve read somewhere that a person tests best in an environment that he or she is familiar and comfortable with. Anyway, my plan is to arrange my students in pairs. Right now the kids are seated in small groups of four to facilitate collaborative learning, but the tables are simply too big for the kids to work across. I encourage them to stand up and move to the other side, but sometimes they’re reluctant to do that. Additionally, partner work has been more effective than group work in my classroom so far. I’d love to do more group work, but it’s a dream in progress, and I think the days would just run more smoothly with students in pairs.

2) Figure out a good system for warm-ups. I have to decide what I want my expectations to be for warm-ups, and I think they’re going to be different for my Geometry classes and my FST classes. For Geometry, I think I might have the students do a weekly warm-up sheet (a la Fawn Nguyen, etc.), but for FST I think I’m going to have them do a daily half-sheet that is either prepared by me with review of some Algebra skills that will be needed for the day’s Functions, Stats, or Trig concept OR that is some sort of writing task. Which  leads me to idea number 3.

3) Incorporate more writing into math class. Still have to think about this one, but I love, love, love it. The ability to communicate is so important in mathematics (and in life, as my mother would say).

4) Continue to build relationships with my students, my school, and the MG community. I just read this article, which was a good reminder to finally attend a basketball game, as well as organize another MG SNOWBOARD AND SKI CLUB!!!!!!! trip. I agreed to be the advisor of the new snowboard and ski team, and it has been mildly hectic, but fun, so far. The other day I realized I have a more experienced background in sports and recreation teaching than I do classroom teaching because I started teaching sailing lessons when I was 14.

Ok, that looks like a pretty good list. Now I just have to work on the enormous pile of grading that I have to do.

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The teacher learns

I’m getting better at making my expectations clear. Giving quick, short directions right away and repeating them until all students are with me sounds obvious, but it’s easy to move on without some kids and then you never really get them back.

Always be one step ahead of the kids. Pass out and explain the next task to the kids before they start their quizlet so that kids who finish early have something to do.

I freaking love warm ups. Haven’t figured out a system for them yet though. Should I preprint the questions on a half sheet? Should I grade it? I think the answer is probably yes to both of those questions, but I don’t love the idea of using more paper or having more things to grade.

Graphic organizers are great. A few phrases in a few boxes is more writing than we usually do in math class. They work on it individually, then in groups, then I solicit answers and go over it as a class.

That reminds me: cold-calling = awesome. I have cards with student names on them that I use. Open ended questions or questions with more than one right answer (give me one of the transformations we’ve talked about) are best.

I’m almost half-way done with my first year! The lows have been low, but the highs have been high, and I keep reminding myself just to be better than I was yesterday. Always learning.

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Filed under classroom management, productive struggle

Making Corrections is Valuable

I love, love, love having the kids make corrections on quizlets (formative assessments) and tests (summative assessments). It requires them to actually look at my feedback and to maybe even learn from their mistakes.

For corrections on the last test in FST, I also had the kids write down one thing they’re proud of or one thing they thought they really learned. I got some great responses back, and I hope it helped remind them of what they did well rather than just focusing on mistakes, so I’m glad I had them do that.

Sample responses:

“I did really well on my factoring. I was worried about it and it went better than I thought. Happy about it.”

“I did well on the quadratic formula.”

“I liked Part 1 because I didn’t get any points off, and I did good with my negatives.”

“Last year I feel like I didn’t get a single quadratic problem correct. I feel like I understand them a lot better this year.”

“Factoring went well and I really have cemented the material in my brain.”

“I learned how to graph equations and find the x-intercepts.”

“I think I really mastered the factoring aspect of this unit.”

“I showed my work.”

“I slowed down this test!”

“Overall, I did OK.”

“I did well at taking my time and going through my work.”

“Test was easy but J. did better than me, so I’m salty. I’m over it. Otherwise, test went pretty well. What really helped was coming in and reviewing with you. Thanks, Ms. Cummins.”

Sometimes these kids drive me crazy, but sometimes they can be thoughtful and serious and make me proud.

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Filed under formative assessment, FST / Algebra 2, grading

Always, Sometimes, Never

I debated some Always, Sometimes, Never statements with my Geometry kids today. In groups, they had to choose the word that they thought went in the blank, as well as draw a picture to explain their choice.

Some example statements (taken straight out of our textbook):
Two planes ________ intersect in a line.
Lines ________ have endpoints.
Lines that are not parallel ________ intersect.
Two points _________ determine a line.

That last one created some interesting discussions, particularly in my last period. Many students wanted to put Sometimes in the blank. I didn’t look at the textbook’s answers, but I assume the authors wanted Always in the blank.

Why did so many students think Sometimes? Well, I think the statement was kind of confusing to them. What does it mean to “determine” a line? Does “a” line mean one line or does it many any line? I tried to resolve the matter by putting two random dots on the board and drawing a line through them. “Look, I can draw a line connecting any two points.” Not particularly convincing.

The students then told me to draw a line going through each of the points (parallel lines, for example). “See,” they told me, “there’s two lines, not a line.” I didn’t really know how to respond to that. I told them yes, I can draw different lines through each point, but only one line will connect them.

Well, I think I convinced them that any two points could be connected with a line, but we just left the Always, Sometimes, Never question unanswered. Which is okay. Of course, some kids insisted, “But what’s the answer?” and I replied, “Well, I think it’s Always, but I don’t think it’s totally clear.”

Perhaps the answer would have been less ambiguous if the original statement was Two points can _________ be connected with a line. But that statement seems way less powerful. So now I am intrigued by the word “determine”. I definitely think it’s important. It’s hard to explain to the kids what is meant by “determine” though.

One instructional difference I would have made during the activity was to require new people to be the writer and the speaker for each statement. In a couple groups, it was very obvious that two or three students were doing all the work while the others checked out, so some sort of rotation would have been smart.

I want to start the next class by playing Sarah Rubin’s Draw It game because some of the drawings I saw today were definitely off the mark, but that’s okay. Visualizing lines and planes and space can be tricky. I love seeing their eyes widen when they begin to “see” it.

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Filed under conversations, Geometry, group work

My Automathography

I’m taking Justin Lanier’s smOOC called Math is Personal, and one of our first assignments is to write our “automathography”. So here’s mine. Enjoy!

Mary’s Automathography

I love math, but I didn’t fall in love with it until college. I was good at math in high school, but I was good at all my classes, so nothing stood out about math in particular. I definitely had a fear of getting the wrong answer in math class, and I was happy to just follow the procedures given to me by my teachers. At this point in my life, I don’t think I understood what mathematics actually was. I won the conference quiz bowl in math my senior year, and it was great to get that recognition, but I graduated high school thinking I would study chemistry in college.

I soon discovered that I did not enjoy working in the lab, but that I did enjoy my math courses, so I ended up majoring in math. I went to a huge university (40,000+ undergraduates), so my first two years of math classes consisted of lectures with 300 students. Despite this, I found myself completely inspired by the professors. I was enamored with how passionate and genuine they seemed. In other subjects, I felt like the professors and TAs were egotistical or arrogant. In contrast, everyone in the math department seemed friendly and easy going. I’ll always remember when one of my calculus professors introduced Euler’s identity. His voice wavered, and I thought he might even cry when he described how this one equation related the most important numbers in mathematics.

Even those first few years of college, I was still focused on answer-getting. This quickly changed when I started taking courses like Real Analysis and Modern Algebra. In these classes, I was finally challenged to think for myself. There were no recipes to follow, and it was completely up to me to decide how to prove or demonstrate something. It was both terrifying and liberating. Math became a creative endeavor for me, and I loved it. I truly came to understand and appreciate Georg Cantor’s quote: “The essence of mathematics is its freedom.”

Besides the creative aspect of math, I also thrived on its collaborative aspect. Getting to know the other students in my classes was so much fun, and struggling with them on math problems late into the night will always be one of my favorite college memories. I also always appreciated how there wasn’t a competitive atmosphere in math, compared with most of the science classes I took. Simply put, I learned so much from doing and talking math with my peers. I became more confident and began to embody the mathematical habits of mind.

In particular, I will never forget the group I worked with in Real Analysis. The professor assigned problems every class which were due the following class (this course required more of my time than any other), so the five of us would get together almost every day, sometimes for several hours, to struggle through them. We would meet in the student union in the evenings, staying later than everyone else and having conversations about math or maybe not about math. Before class, we would meet in the math library to share any last minute insights, often getting looks from others for being too loud. Naturally, a strong bond formed between the five of us. On weekends (or Thursdays, or whenever we could no longer stand to stare at our papers) we would go out and get drinks together.

The experiences I had in classes like Real Analysis really transformed my idea of math. I learned the value of productive struggle and collaboration. I learned how to be creative in math and make it my own. I really felt mathematically strong at the end of it all.

Fast forward to the present- five years after that Real Analysis class. I am now about to start my first-year teaching high school math. I hope I don’t suck.

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Filed under culture, fun, productive struggle

So Excited!

Ahhhh! I am so excited to start teaching!!!!!

I just can’t contain my excitement right now, so I had to post something.

I am at school right now (can finally start moving into my classroom!), where I just finished a 3 hour district training on building classroom community. It was so great. Most of the new teachers in the district were there, and I always really appreciate connecting with people who are at the same place as me.

The training was well organized and enjoyable. I didn’t really learn anything new, but it was wonderful to be able to discuss ideas with colleagues and process everything I’ve been thinking about over the summer. It was put on by the district’s teacher mentors, who were incredibly welcoming and enthusiastic. One of the mentors was previously (until this year) a math teacher at the high school, and she is just so lovely and helpful to have as a resource.

There are actually FOUR new math teachers at the high school this year, and three of us were at the training, so it was awesome to connect with those guys as well. I feel like we’re already bonding, and after the training the three of us went upstairs to the math department, checked out each other’s rooms, and continued to talk about the upcoming school year. Then they even helped me move my computer, which was oddly set up on a table in right in front of the whiteboard, on to my desk and made sure everything was functioning. Really great people. I am truly looking forward to collaborating with them this year.

In fact, all of the staff and administration I’ve met so far have been great, and the district seems very welcoming and supportive. How did I get so lucky?

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Filed under collaboration