Tag Archives: fun

End of 3rd Quarter

Hi everyone.

It’s the end of 3rd quarter, and we’ve got a grading day. Actually half-day. So I thought I should blog since I got the time! No kids! It’s some sort of miracle. I’m fortunate at my school to have a prep period and a department planning period… but during my prep, I can expect to supervise 8 to 10 up-to-no-good-but-so-lovable seniors. Up-to-no-good is definitely putting a positive spin on it. During my plan period, I can expect to supervise two or three accelerated freshmen for whom school comes easy and are mostly bored with it, and two or three sophomores who care, but need me to give them 1-1 tutoring in Geometry.

In short, having some time to myself in my classroom is some sort of miracle. It never happens. Now if only I had something interesting and substantial to blog about.

The kids are the best part of the job though. Forget grading, planning, and prepping. I do what I do because I believe in those little punks. They’re beautiful, lovely, funny, and smart. They deserve the best.

OK, here’s something worth blogging about. I just taught right triangle trigonometry to my Geometry kiddos. I love introducing trig. This year it conveniently followed a similarity unit, so I introduced it with a quick lab measuring sides of triangles and computing SOHCAHTOA ratios. Huh, weird, for any 30 degree angle in a right triangle, the ratio of the opposite side and the hypotenuse is the same. Huh, weird. (Similar triangles, anyone?)

Then we do some boring, but straightforward practice. Then the next class we go on a field trip. I love to advertise this next bit as a field trip, even though we only go down two floors to the Commons.

I start by having them estimate the height of the ceiling in the Commons (we regularly do Estimation180 in Geometry). Then I have them take out their telly-phones and download a free clinometer app. The only issue is the kids who say, “but I don’t have any room on my phone”. Maybe if you deleted some of those dang selfies, kid.

I crappily, but enthusiastically, model what they’re supposed to do. (My teaching career is a work in progress, OK? Year two is better than year one, at least.) I pass out the awesome, giant tape measures that the math department owns. We disperse down to the Commons. Chaos ensues, naturally, but we’re on a field trip in math class, so it’s a good thing. Tape measures are being stretched out, kids are pointing their phones at the ceiling, and most kids are sketching a triangle and writing down some sort of trigonometric equation. It’s my favorite day of the year.

Eventually we return to the classroom. My least-focused kid (one of those with an ADHD star next to his name in Infinite Campus) happily sits down and gets to work solving trig equations. How could he not? I just let him run around the Commons for 10 minutes.

They’re beautiful creatures, ya feel?

IMG_1956

8.4 trig lab

8.5 trig invest how high is ceiling (I think this was adapted from something from Tina Cardone @ drawingonmath ??? Not sure. But I definitely stand on the shoulders of giants. Thank you all.)

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Filed under fun, Geometry, grading, trig

Fun with Expected Value

I just taught expected value in FST and really enjoyed it. The two main tasks I used were: The Carnival Candy Game and Dan Meyer’s Money Duck.

The Carnival Candy Game

You’re at a carnival and you get to pick one piece of candy from a bag. The color candy you draw determines how much money you win. I used starbursts, and I set it up like so:

starburst data as jpg

The students didn’t win money; rather they won that many starbursts. (I had a different bag of starbursts for prize winnings because I made sure that the candy drawn was replaced each time to keep the probabilities the same for everyone.)

This was enjoyable because naturally all the kids wanted to pick the purple one. Not surprisingly, most picked pink, yellow, or red, but I have 45 FST students (two classes), and the 44th student did pick the purple one.

Then I asked them to calculate the expected value for their prize winnings when playing this game.

Then I said, suppose it costs $5 to play this game. What does that mean for the player? What does it mean for the carnival game host?

Money Duck

Love the Money Duck. The students were very engaged by the idea of the money duck. I basically followed Dan Anderson’s lesson plan for this one. Like Dan’s students, and as I commented on his post, my students also wanted to determine the possible/impossible distributions based on what they saw in the video instead of in theory. I slightly fixed that in my second class by stopping the video after the first $1 money duck, explaining that the video was made up, and stressing that we were interested in what is possible, not necessarily what the company actually does.

Like Dan, I had my students come up with company names, probabilities, and price. They then had to compute expected value and their profit. I also compiled the data in a spreadsheet, but didn’t really do anything with it, unfortunately. If I did it again I would like to have the students do some more sharing and comparing between groups.

money duck groups jpg

I definitely recommend both tasks.

And then things got even better. Today was the grand opening of a new Cabela’s nearby my school, so several of my male seniors told me how they all skipped class this morning (well, some of them probably had open campus 1st period… I hope) to get in line at the new store because the first 500 customers received a gift card up to $500. One of them said, “But Ms. Cummins, they didn’t tell us how many were for $500″. It turned out that they all got $10 gift cards except for one who got a $25. It was perfect. I told them I was going to write a test question about that.

 

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Filed under FST / Algebra 2, fun, probability

‘Twas the day before break…

My goal for my Geometry classes today was to be as mathematically productive as possible, given that it was the last day of classes before break. The plan was to review the last assignment, take the quizlet (what my department calls formative assessment), do an extension problem, then make a Koch Snowflake if there was still time.

The extension problem was the “Shortest Path Problem” which I highly recommend.

Shortest path problem

It turned out to fit perfectly with what we’re learning right now. It also sparked some rich conversations and good reasoning, and everyone could at least venture a guess, even if they didn’t really know what to do to figure out the exact shortest path.

This plan was carried out differently in each of my three Geometry classes. In the first class, I reviewed several problems and concepts, kids followed along, asked questions, the usual. They took the quizlet. I passed out a half-sheet with the scenario typed out on it. I didn’t include a diagram, thinking that the kids should make the diagram. That was a mistake because the wording isn’t exactly clear, so some kids drew the tent and camper on opposite sides of the river and all sorts of random things. So I had to draw the diagram up on the board for everyone, which slightly killed the magic, but at least we were all on the same page.

A few kids calculated the distance of a path, but not the shortest, and then wanted to be done. I needed a way to motivate them to keep working. In a rare moment of brilliance, I decided to keep score. I announced “Jesse found a path that’s 1,518 feet, can anyone beat that?”. Then I’d write the student’s name and their shortest path on the board. It became a competition to see who could find the shortest path. I let things linger too long in my first class because a few students were really getting into it and asking wonderful questions like, “how do you know that’s 450 feet” and “can you show me how you got that”. So unfortunately several kids had checked out, but at least everyone did something with the problem.

In my other two classes, I skipped the homework review and went straight to the quizlet because there was no way they were going to sit and listen to me blah blah blah about their homework problems on dilations and scale factors. In my first afternoon class, student behavior dictated that decision. In my second afternoon class, I asked them what they wanted to do, and almost everyone said, “let’s just take the quizlet”. So in those classes, there was plenty of time to do both the shortest path problem and the Koch Snowflake.

This time I just asked them to read the problem on their own, and then I read it aloud and drew the diagram as I read so everyone started out with the correct diagram. In one class several kids said they didn’t know what to do to get started, so I said “guess and check” or “if you were the camper, where would you go if you wanted the shortest distance”. This was an excellent starting point for those kids.

The snowflakes were fun too. We saw the Sierpinski Triangle this year, so I brought that up again as a reminder of what a fractal is, but then said that the fractal they were about to make was going to be more holiday-themed. I gave everyone some triangle graph paper to help them with their triangles. At first I thought maybe I’d have them construct the equilateral triangle, but using the graph paper was a good call.

photo (3)

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Filed under fun, Geometry

Math. Just for the heck of it.

Here’s the visual for an excellent math problem by FiveTriangles that Dylan Kane introduced to the MTBoS. I had noticed some conversation about it on Twitter, so I thought I should give it a try. The prompt is: What proportion of area of the three congruent equilateral triangles is shaded?

I don’t want to give away any answers or methods, but I will say that this is a really nice problem. I did the things that were obvious to me at first, but then I got a little stuck. So then I got a bit flustered. “I have a math degree- this should take me ten seconds,” I irrationally thought to myself. I tried some stupid things that I knew weren’t going to help me, and after that I had to go take care of something else, so I left my pencil and paper on the table and didn’t think about those triangles again until later that day. When I returned to the problem, something suddenly clicked, and I was able to quickly move forward and solve the problem. Funny how that works.

It was super fun to do some math just for the heck of it. I should do more of that.

I would definitely recommend giving this one a try, but please, no spoilers! Don’t comment with your answer. Email me or tweet me if you want to exchange solutions.

Enjoy!

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Filed under fun