Monthly Archives: January 2015

A quick anecdote on feedback

I passed back some Geometry tests the other day, and there was a problem on similar triangles in which students had to agree or disagree with a statement and explain why. While grading, I wrote “well said” or “nicely stated” next to any convincing explanations.

A student saw this comment, and asked me, “Is this supposed to be sarcastic or what?”

I was surprised. “No… I meant that. I thought it was a good explanation.”

The kid responded, “Oh, well it was in red so I thought it was bad.”

So that was interesting, and it has me thinking about different types of feedback. What does effective feedback look like? How do kids perceive feedback?

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Filed under culture, grading

A cold day, followed by a beautiful display of student initiative

Yesterday we had a cold day! It’s like a snow day, except it’s really cold out. With wind chill, temperatures around here were -35 F. The timing was good because somehow I ended up being really sick yesterday. So I didn’t particularly enjoy myself on my day off (in fact, I felt terrible), but thankfully I could nap by the fire, drink tea, and spend the day recuperating.

Anyway, I wanted to post about a proud moment from my FST class today. These kids are used to a lot of hand-holding and spoon-feeding, and many of them rarely do independent work (unless I really hound them). Most days, I’ll hear this from at least one FST student: “I’ll be honest, Ms. C, I’m not gonna do this.”

These kids are mostly seniors who’ve been placed in “lower track” math classes their whole life, so changing their mindset isn’t easy. But they did elect to take 4 years of math in high school, plus they’re all good kids, so I know it’s worth it to keep trying.

Today, I told them I would walk them through one example of each type of problem (unit circle stuff), but that was it. No more.

A few kids said, “Aw, can’t you keep going.”

“Nope. I said that was all I was going to do as a class.”

Here is where one kid said, “We can keep doing them as a class, I’ll just go up there.” And he did.

The awesome thing was this kid didn’t know how to solve the problems. But he was willing to go up there and try to figure it out. It probably helped that he’s in the drama club and is an anchor on the school announcements.

So he starts to play the role of the teacher. “Ok, so let’s do problem 2: 495 degrees. We need to find an equivalent rotation between 0 and 360 degrees. How do we do that?”

Miraculously, the rest of the kids played along.

“It’s 45 degrees.” “No, it’s 135 degrees.” “How’d you get that?”

The 135 degree kid explains his thinking, the kid at the board follows along, agrees, and writes down 135.

I quickly snap out of my state of shock and try to remember good techniques for facilitating student discussions.

So I ask, “S, could you please repeat how you got 135?”

So he does.

“Thank you. Can someone summarize or rephrase what S just said?”

Someone does.

And, oh man, it was beautiful. Students were participating without any prodding from me. I managed to remember to ask good questions (Who can rephrase that? Who did it differently?) and to occasionally ask for a collective pause to let something sink in for everyone before moving on. Most importantly, I remembered not to interrupt too much.

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Filed under classroom management, collaboration, culture, FST / Algebra 2

Plans for the New Year

Happy new year! What a wonderful winter holiday this has been. I think I really lucked out as a first year teacher getting a two-week break from school this year. It was been a period of relaxation and rejuvenation, as well as a celebration of family, friends, and good times. And it’s not even over yet!

As a result, I’ve had plenty of time to reflect upon my teaching experience so far, and as a result, I’ve developed some ideas and plans for the new year and next semester’s classes. I still have two weeks left to wrap up before finals week, so while I may implement some fresh ideas now, I might not get around to all of them until the new semester starts.

Here are some thoughts I’ve had, in no particularly order.

1) Change up the seating arrangement. This one I’m going to save until second semester because I don’t want to throw off the kids right before finals week because I swear I’ve read somewhere that a person tests best in an environment that he or she is familiar and comfortable with. Anyway, my plan is to arrange my students in pairs. Right now the kids are seated in small groups of four to facilitate collaborative learning, but the tables are simply too big for the kids to work across. I encourage them to stand up and move to the other side, but sometimes they’re reluctant to do that. Additionally, partner work has been more effective than group work in my classroom so far. I’d love to do more group work, but it’s a dream in progress, and I think the days would just run more smoothly with students in pairs.

2) Figure out a good system for warm-ups. I have to decide what I want my expectations to be for warm-ups, and I think they’re going to be different for my Geometry classes and my FST classes. For Geometry, I think I might have the students do a weekly warm-up sheet (a la Fawn Nguyen, etc.), but for FST I think I’m going to have them do a daily half-sheet that is either prepared by me with review of some Algebra skills that will be needed for the day’s Functions, Stats, or Trig concept OR that is some sort of writing task. Which¬† leads me to idea number 3.

3) Incorporate more writing into math class. Still have to think about this one, but I love, love, love it. The ability to communicate is so important in mathematics (and in life, as my mother would say).

4) Continue to build relationships with my students, my school, and the MG community. I just read this article, which was a good reminder to finally attend a basketball game, as well as organize another MG SNOWBOARD AND SKI CLUB!!!!!!! trip. I agreed to be the advisor of the new snowboard and ski team, and it has been mildly hectic, but fun, so far. The other day I realized I have a more experienced background in sports and recreation teaching than I do classroom teaching because I started teaching sailing lessons when I was 14.

Ok, that looks like a pretty good list. Now I just have to work on the enormous pile of grading that I have to do.

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Filed under planning