A Flop

Had a pretty big lesson flop today. I was frustrated at the end of the particular class, but I’ve thought about some things I can do to improve. Fortunately, I’m on an A-B schedule, so I get to re-do the lesson on Monday with another class. (My A-day kids always get the flops.)

I’m almost too embarrassed to write about the lesson because so much was wrong with it. I am tweaking every part of it for Monday. I thought about scraping the main task altogether, but it’s a good task that was ruined by poor implementation.

First, I am not going to assume the students remember how to do something even though I know they studied it last year. Flying through one example and saying, “This is familiar, right?” isn’t going to cut it. It turns out what they learned last year was a “trick” anyway, so I definitely need to do a better job explaining explicitly what is happening conceptually.

Second, I am not going to throw a handout at them and expect them to get to work. I am going to do a better job explaining the task and modeling how they should get started. I just read the phrase “model curiosity” while surfing some blogs, and I think it perfectly describes what I need to do at the beginning of a task.

Third, I’ve got to follow through on my behavior expectations. I had too many non-participating, off-task students. Worst of all, I let them behave that way. I let them get out of their assigned seats. This is my problem. I don’t like telling people what to do. I just want them to do the right thing. But I have to remember that high schoolers are still kids, and they still need guidance. Basically, I’ve got to toughen up. I’ve got to enforce my expectations.

Fourth, I want to do a better job structuring group work. I think this will also help me with my classroom management issues. I think I need to bring the groups back for a whole-class check-in more often. If there are four parts to the task, then I think I should bring everyone back together to go over each one before we move on to the next. In contrast, today I just said “do it” and consequently lost a lot of people, who never came back when I tried to go over everything at the end. So, on Monday, as students make progress on part 1, I’m going to bring us back together and have groups share. Then I’m going to explain part 2 and let them go. Then I’m going to bring them back again for a whole-class discussion on part 2. Then I’m going to explain part 3, and so on.

The tricky bit will be bringing everyone back. They’ll want to keep talking to their friends, but I need them to pay attention to me or whoever is sharing. I really need something to get everyone’s attention back. Maybe a timer, but students might work more slowly or more quickly than I anticipate. Another new teacher, who is in the English department, shared with me her method for bring everyone back. She simply says, “I need everyone back up here in 3.. 2… 1.” That sounds magical to me.

I can probably pull it off. I can do anything, right? I think what will work for me and for my students is to explain to them at the beginning what it’s going to look like. I will explain that I will let them work on part 1 for a bit, but that when I say “I need everyone back up here in 3, 2, 1” they need to stop where they are, turn to the front, and listen because we are going to share ideas at that point.

Overall, I think I need to be a better communicator. Specifically, I need to be more explicit with my directions and my expectations. More explicit with some of my explanations of content would also be good. Again, these are kids, not adults. They are learners, not experienced mathematicians. They are relying on me to communicate well.

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1 Comment

Filed under classroom management, group work, planning

One response to “A Flop

  1. If you want to communicate better, there is no better way to learn how than to join a Toastmasters club. I joined a club in 2005, thinking I would set a good example for my son who was in sales at the time. I never got him interested, but I have been taking part in clubs ever since. It is a great program for building confidence and competence in public speaking and leadership.

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